*that is inaccurate

colorist at Berluti.
graduate of SAIC.
resident of NJ.
UU.
INFJ

貓鳥

Reblogged from knsculpt  170,810 notes

snailsocks:

I sent this to at least 12 people with 0 context

Reblogged from knsculpt  25,456 notes

maladydee:

appropriately-inappropriate:

casethejointfirst:

Here’s a good rundown of earth history. I’ve been finding myself reading into earlier geologic time periods out of sheer fascination.

This is amazing.

There’s a really great documentary, “a history of planet earth” that walks you through it and it’s fascinating. The Cambrian explosion was neat as shit.

I love the way that the Quaternary period has both humans and sabre tooth cats as a hazard. it makes you realize how much can change over geologic timescales.

Reblogged from chicagoartnerd  1,214 notes

medievalpoc:

^ This is the British Library Digitized Manuscripts Site.

A lot of people have asked about my process doing research for medievalpoc. I use a lot of resources and tools that are readily available for anyone to use, and this is one of them. There are thousands of manuscripts available to just page through and zoom in on, as if you had the book right in front of you.

If the idea of searching through endless lists of titles and numbers is daunting to you, the Digitized Medieval Manuscripts Collection has a blog.

The blog makes topical posts with images of the manuscripts according to those topics, and then links to the full manuscripts, so you can go looking at them yourself:

image

Like so:

image

You can learn what the heck a Leucrota is supposed to be here.

They also have a Twitter.

One of the best things about medievalpoc is that I get to see people get excited about art and history, and if you decide you’d like to go exploring, this is a great place to do that. I think the manuscript viewer is relatively user-friendly, and there’s a ton of information about the histories of the manuscripts themselves there, too.